Rambling around Windermere

The Lake District is a special place and our 5 night visit only makes me want to return, as soon as possible, to do some serious rambling and ‘fell bagging‘.

Windermere‘ is the lake and the town. You do not, apparently, have to say ‘Windermere Lake’ unless differentiating, say to meet someone, from ‘Windermere’. It is the largest of all the lakes. We stayed in Bowness, at Windermere, in a gorgeous little B&B with generous hosts and great breakfasts. It was easy to stroll along trails around the village, through woods, farmland and sleepy cottages. There were superb swans on the lake. I did these lovely walks.

cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

Mountain Goat are the most excellent tour guides in The Lake District and their Ten Lakes Spectacular was a useful introduction to the area. It was a sunny day and the shot below, sums up my mood and the weather.


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

Lucy and Sarah both enjoyed the experience of these lakes and one suspects Kate enjoyed not walking so far. We all liked stopping in ancent Keswick for lunch. Peter, the guide, was affable and knowledgeable with the gift of storytelling in his repertoire. The lakes are truly spectacular and I particularly like this HDR shot of the girls and I up high.

Walking is a steady, natural metre of mind and one of my favourite pursuits. I could have spent a month exploring these oft-walked paths with my camera and the evenings with a book about the history, ecology and geography of the region. The time to wait patiently, camera mounted on tripod, overlooking the landscape, is what I mostly want to do. I did take a few photos but time alone is needed for epic shots. Here’s my Lake District set on flickr.  

I will write more about walking, Wordsworth’s vision for his life and the companionship he shared with Coleridge shortly.

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