Via Appia Antica


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

We walked along the Appian Way today, occasionally the girls marched. This journey was special for me and I was rather elated to have such an experience with antiquity. I suggest you read the link in the first sentence, it is a brief history of the importance of this road that links Rome with the south of Italy and who built it.

Without waiting to be told what to do by the Senate, Appius Claudius began

Claudius Appius must have been an impressive, innovative character. Rome needed the road. He built it!

cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore 


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore 

There are some interesting houses along the Appian Way. I wondered who lived in most and noticed plenty of security – dogs and cameras – to deter visitors. 

cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

An unexpected bonus was stumbling upon the Catacombs of San Callisto. According to our guide, 500 000 christians are entombed in 20 kilometres of underground passages here covering an area of 37 acres. There at least 40 other catacombs around Rome. Christians, before the Edict of Milan, were secretive in their burial practices through necessity.

If in Rome, we highly recommend you visit some catacombs in the heat of the early afternoon. It is a fascinating and coolly refreshing experience, especially after the rigours of the Appian Way.

I should mention that Lucy and Sarah had no trouble assuming a number of roles during the day – gladiators, pilgrims, legionaries and tourists – and were particularly pleased that they had the answers to many of the guide’s questions, as he asked them to be archaeologists.

Unfortunately, no photographs were permitted in the catacombs.