Vesuvio and Pompeii

Every school child learns about Pompeii (here is the official site) and the serendipitous disaster of 79 AD by reading the primary source accounts of Pliny the Younger, who, as an eighteen year old, witnessed the eruption of Mount Vesuvius (Vesuvio) and resulting havoc.

This archaeological site was on our itinerary as Lucy, our budding archaeologist, wanted to visit. I am glad we did. As always, visiting broadens understanding and so often makes one realise how important it is for students to leave the classroom, as regularly as possible, to motivate, provide quality learning experiences and new insights.

For example, I had not realised just how far the volcano is from Pompeii or just how enormous the site is to wander until visiting. I’d also not realised how leafy and pleasant ‘the ruins’ were in places either. Another minor matter, I did not see any security or tourist shops inside Pompeii. There is a minimum of plaques or distracting info boards. We liked this after, for example, seeing shops selling curios and trinkets INSIDE Notre Dame.

We ascended Mount Vesuvio in the morning and were afforded a magnificent, if a little hazy, view of the bay and Naples before seeing the crater. Tourists have been visiting here for a long time and the views are truly magnificent.


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore 

It is a very dusty walk to the crater and I recommend avoiding sandals. The clouds were great, nicely layered and a little threatening. The temperature dropped markedly and wind howled.


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore 


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore 

It was hot but the girls enjoyed wandering through Pompeii after a bus ride from the volcano. We ended up following a tour, led by an amusing fellow, for quite a while. This was very handy as the streets are quite difficult to navigate and many travellers were clearly struggling to find various points of interest.


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore 

We noticed that live performances are still held at Pompeii and thought it would be a pleasant experience one summer’s evening.  Anyone ever had that pleasure?

We also thought it cool that real vineyards are thriving amongst ‘the ruins’.


cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo shared by Darcy Moore

What are your memories of Vesuvio and Pompeii?

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2 thoughts on “Vesuvio and Pompeii

  1. Pompeii looks lovely in the sunshine. We travelled this way during a cold European winter many years ago. I’m thinking we need to return!
    BTW, I hope you bathed poor Kate’s feet…..they look hot and dusty in your ‘homage to feet’

  2. Salve, Michelle,

    Thanks for following our blog/travels. I appreciate it.

    It is interesting that ancient literature, homer and the like, much emphasis is place on bathing feet. One can see why. To bathe the feet, personally, of a loved one or guest was the ultimate homage and fidelity.

    Ciao,
    Darcy

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